Science

  • 4:40pm Jun 15, 2013
    National National Science

    Will The Court's Gene Ruling Stifle Bio Innovation?

    Weekend Edition Saturday Host Scott Simon talks with bioethicist Arthur Caplan of New York University about Thursday's Supreme Court ruling that isolated human genes may not be patented — and the implications for that ruling.
  • 4:13pm Jun 14, 2013
    Science Science Health & Safety

    Decoding 'the Most Complex Object in the Universe'

    The human brain contains some 100 billion neurons, which together form a network of Internet-like complexity. Christof Koch, chief scientific officer of the Allen Institute for Brain Science, calls the brain "the most complex object in the known universe," and he's mapping its connections in hopes of discovering the origins of consciousness.
  • 4:13pm Jun 14, 2013
    Science Science

    Rolling Out Bamboo Bicycles

    Valid Cycles specializes in handcrafted bamboo bicycle frames. To be bike-ready, the bamboo must be cooked in an oven, stripped, and sealed. But after that, the founders of Valid Cycles say the bikes last as long as a metal one. We stopped by their shop — a barn in Woodinville, Washington — for a look at how the bikes are put together.
  • 4:13pm Jun 14, 2013
    Science Science Health & Safety

    Human Genes Not Patentable, Supreme Court Says

    The U.S. Supreme Court ruled this week that the mere act of isolating a DNA sequence does not make human genes patentable. Mary-Claire King, who helped discover the breast cancer gene at the center of the court dispute, discusses the ruling and its implications for genetics.
  • 4:13pm Jun 14, 2013
    Science Science Environment

    Denis Hayes on Being Green

    Since his days as head of the Solar Energy Research Institute under President Jimmy Carter, Denis Hayes has been pushing to add more renewable energy sources to the country's energy portfolio. Hayes discusses the current U.S. market for renewables such as solar and wind, and gives his take on where he sees America's energy future headed.
  • 4:13pm Jun 14, 2013
    Science Science Environment

    With Climate Change, No Happy Clams

    Carbon emissions are slowly acidifying ocean waters, forcing marine life to adapt. Oysters and other shellfish, for example, may have a harder time building their shells, according to NOAA's Richard Feely. At Quilcene, Washington's Taylor Shellfish Hatchery, research director Benoit Eudeline says he's already seeing those effects.
  • 4:13pm Jun 14, 2013
    Science Science

    Looking Back, and Up, at a Seattle Icon

    Seattle's Space Needle opened in 1962 as part of the World's Fair. Knute Berger, author of Space Needle: The Spirit of Seattle, discusses the history and engineering behind the tower, and explains why a symbol of "the future" from days gone by still has relevance today.
  • 4:13pm Jun 14, 2013
    Science Science Environment

    Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn Talks Climate and Carbon

    Like any major city near a coast, Seattle likely won't be immune from rising sea levels and other effects of global warming. Mayor Mike McGinn discusses the city's plans for addressing climate change, including his push to divest Seattle's pension funds from fossil fuel investments, and the city council's plan to make Seattle carbon neutral by 2050.
  • 4:19pm Jun 13, 2013
    Science Science Environment

    What Bird Flocks And Fish Schools Can Teach Us About The Future

    Birds flock. Insects swarm. Fish swim in schools. These are all examples of collective behavior, a concept that has fascinated scientists for decades. For a recent piece in Wired Magazine, science writer Ed Yong explains what this research could tell us about predicting the future.
  • 6:02am Jun 13, 2013
    Science Science

    Fancy Feet: Wild Cheetahs Excel At Acceleration

    Cheetahs don't often hunt at their top speed, scientists are finding. Come mealtime, what matters most is the animals' ability to accelerate and to take tight corners.