Research News

  • 2:29pm Feb 04, 2013
    Science Science

    Scientists Discover Dung Beetles Use The Milky Way For GPS

    A team of scientists has discovered that dung beetles climb on dung balls and dance around in circles before taking off. This dance is not one of joy, however — the insects are checking out the sky to get their bearings. Melissa Block and Audie Cornish have more.
  • Disinfecting robots at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore spray rooms with toxic doses of hydrogen peroxide to kill dangerous drug-resistant bacteria.
    Rebecca Hersher/NPR
    6:16pm Feb 03, 2013
    Science Science Health & Safety

    Got A Superbug? Bring In The Robots

    Johns Hopkins Hospital is using disinfecting robots to kill dangerous drug-resistant bacteria in its hospital rooms. Since it began using the machines, the hospital has seen the number of untreatable infections fall by a stunning 64 percent.
  • The eye of Hurricane Earl in the Atlantic Ocean, seen from a NASA research aircraft on Aug. 30, 2010. This flight through the eyewall caught Earl just as it was intensifying from a Category 2 to a Category 4 hurricane. Researchers collected air samples on
    Jane Peterson / NASA
    8:36am Jan 29, 2013
    Science Science Environment

    Bird, Plane, Bacteria? Microbes Thrive In Storm Clouds

    Microbes can thrive in extreme environments, from inside fiery volcanoes to down on the bottom of the ocean. Now scientists have found a surprising number of them living in storm clouds tens of thousands of feet above the Earth. And those airborne microbes could play a role in global climate.
  • 1:03pm Jan 25, 2013
    Science Science

    Canine Mystery: How Dogs Became Man's Best Friend

    Dogs were the first animals to be domesticated, but scientists have long debated precisely how--and when--it happened. With archaeological records and genetic research leading to different hypotheses, are we any closer to understanding how dogs became man's best friend?
  • 1:00pm Jan 25, 2013
    Science Science

    Shakespeare's Sonnets, Encoded In DNA

    Reporting in Nature, researchers write of encoding a variety of files--jpg, mp3, txt and pdf--in strands of DNA. Lead author Nick Goldman says DNA is extraordinarily long-lasting, compared to today's hard drives and magnetic tapes. And if all the world's information were written in DNA, he says, it would fit in the back of a station wagon.
  • Health workers in Nepal culled chickens and destroyed eggs following an outbreak of bird flu in Kathmandu in October 2012.
    Prakash Mathema / AFP/Getty Images
    8:53pm Jan 23, 2013
    World News World News Science Health & Safety

    Scientists Put An End To Moratorium On Bird Flu Research

    After researchers created versions of the bird flu virus that could spread more easily, critics began to worry that the work could spawn a pandemic if a virus escaped from the lab. After halting their work for more than a year, scientists now say the benefits outweigh the risks, and they are set to restart their experiments.
  • Two chimps groom each other at the Save the Chimps facility in Florida. The National Institutes of Health owns about 360 chimpanzees that aren't yet retired and that are living at research facilities; new guidelines say most of its chimps should be retire
    Save the Chimps
    3:56pm Jan 23, 2013
    Science Science Health & Safety

    Rules Would Retire Most Research Chimps

    An NIH working group recommends that most of the agency's 360 research chimpanzees be sent to a sanctuary — a non-laboratory setting where chimps can live more natural lives. But even if the NIH accepts the recommendations, putting them into effect won't be easy.
  • 1:03pm Jan 18, 2013
    Science Science Arts

    Edward Tufte Wants You to See Better

    Data scientist Edward Tufte (dubbed the "Galileo of graphics" by BusinessWeek) pioneered the field of data visualization. Tufte discusses what he calls "forever knowledge," and his latest projects: sculpting Richard Feynman's diagrams, and helping people "see without words."