Product Placement #5

Product Placement #5

10:17pm Sep 09, 2015

It seems like you can't escape ads these days, but did you know that you can even find them lurking in some...pop songs? In this game, we've mashed up brand names with the titles of well-known tunes to create the ultimate product placement.

Heard in Sutton Foster: Really, Anything Goes

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Transcript

JONATHAN COULTON, BYLINE: From NPR and WNYC, live from the Bell House in beautiful Brooklyn, N.Y., it's NPR's hour of puzzles, word games and trivia, ASK ME ANOTHER. Here's your host, Ophira Eisenberg.

(CHEERS, APPLAUSE)

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Thank you, Jonathan. Our VIP is a Broadway star who has won Tonys for her roles in "Thoroughly Modern Millie" and "Anything Goes." She's also the star of a TV Land series, "Younger," where she plays a 40-year-old that has to pass as 26 to land a job in the New York publishing industry. Our VIP is Sutton Foster.

(CHEERS, APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Our first game is one of our favorites. It's called Product Placement. And here to play it are Jonathan Greenstein and Regina Rizzo.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Hello.

REGINA RIZZO: Hello.

JONATHAN GREENSTEIN: Hello.

EISENBERG: Jonathan, you're a high school teacher?

GREENSTEIN: I am, yes.

EISENBERG: How are the kids these days?

GREENSTEIN: They're there.

(LAUGHTER)

GREENSTEIN: They are definitely there.

EISENBERG: Do you have hope for the future?

GREENSTEIN: Absolutely. I was just thinking about how much hope I have for the future today while I was - yes, absolutely.

EISENBERG: Why? What happened?

GREENSTEIN: I think about it every day.

EISENBERG: Yeah?

GREENSTEIN: Yes, just such hope for the future.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: And Regina, you're a manager at a costume shop.

RIZZO: Yes.

EISENBERG: How long have you been doing that?

RIZZO: Since college.

EISENBERG: OK.

RIZZO: I'm one of the few who graduated with the arts degree and is using it...

EISENBERG: Oh, wow – God, yeah.

RIZZO: ...One of the very few (laughter).

EISENBERG: Well, you may have thought to yourself, you know, with Spotify and music piracy it is probably pretty hard to make a living as a musician in today's world. It's true. It's very sad. Sometimes, musicians even have to resort to taking gigs on NPR puzzle shows.

(LAUGHTER)

COULTON: I'm right here, and I can hear you, Ophira.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: So it's no wonder that musicians have taken to squeezing names of products in their song titles.

COULTON: If I said Daft Punk's huge 2013 dance hit was really about staying up all night and eating this leprechaun endorsed cereal, you would say, get Lucky Charms.

EISENBERG: So you have to mash up the song title with the name of the product or company, and the winner will move on to our final round at the end of the show. The fryer's going to fry, fry, fry, fry, fry, but Taylor Swift prefers using a flavored breadcrumb style coating from Kraft and cooking her chicken in the oven.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Jonathan.

GREENSTEIN: What is shake and bake it off?

RIZZO: (Laughter).

EISENBERG: Almost.

GREENSTEIN: Oh, shake it off and bake.

(LAUGHTER)

GREENSTEIN: Shake it off and bake.

COULTON: Keep saying words, Jonathan.

(LAUGHTER)

GREENSTEIN: Bake and shake. Shake and bake it off.

COULTON: Yeah, that's correct.

EISENBERG: Yeah, that was it.

(LAUGHTER, APPLAUSE)

RIZZO: Well done. Well done.

EISENBERG: And just a quick note, not every game is Jeopardy.

(LAUGHTER)

GREENSTEIN: What were you going for?

EISENBERG: No, that you said it, shake and bake it off. But you started by saying, what is.

(LAUGHTER)

GREENSTEIN: Oh.

(LAUGHTER)

GREENSTEIN: NPR wasn't my first choice.

(LAUGHTER, APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Sir Mix-a-Lot said, I like big blooming onions, and I cannot lie, when he entered his favorite Australian-themed chain restaurant.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Regina.

RIZZO: Baby got Outback.

EISENBERG: Very good.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Everyone thinks this Third Eye Blind song is about crystal meth addiction, but they really wanted something else, a certain breakfast food that Mikey really likes.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Jonathan.

GREENSTEIN: A semi-charmed Life cereal.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

RIZZO: Well done.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: When Nelly sang about the rise of temperature, he was talking about the flames he painted on his tricked out, collectible toy cars from Mattel.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Jonathan.

GREENSTEIN: Hot in her – Hot Wheels in here.

EISENBERG: Yes.

(LAUGHTER)

RIZZO: Well done.

EISENBERG: Nice.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Meghan Trainor's doo-wop style song about positive body image ensures that everyone on the dance floor feels like they're in good hands.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Jonathan.

GREENSTEIN: Allstate about that bass?

EISENBERG: Yeah, that's right.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: I am so surprised Allstate hasn't used that yet, frankly. It's so good. All right, this is your last question.

RIZZO: OK.

EISENBERG: With a certain coffee chain popping up on every corner of every U.S. city, this will soon be the title of our national anthem.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Jonathan.

GREENSTEIN: Starbucks spangled banner.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(APPLAUSE)

RIZZO: Well done.

EISENBERG: Puzzle guru Greg Pliska, how did our contestants do?

GREG PLISKA, BYLINE: Congratulations, Jonathan. You're moving on to the Ask Me One More final round at the end of our show.

(APPLAUSE) Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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