Mongol Rally: London To Ulan-Ude In the Most Beat-Up Car You Can Find

Mongol Rally: London To Ulan-Ude In the Most Beat-Up Car You Can Find

4:34pm Jun 16, 2015
Participants in the Mongol Rally will cross more than 17 countries, head through mountains and deserts, cross a sea or two, and skirt several war zones. (Mongol Rally)
  • Participants in the Mongol Rally will cross more than 17 countries, head through mountains and deserts, cross a sea or two, and skirt several war zones. (Mongol Rally)

  • Mongol Rally participants will travel 10,000 miles from London to Mongolia. (Mongol Rally)

  • The journey comes with its risks -- it has resulted in some injuries and at least one death. (Mongol Rally)

  • If nothing has gone wrong, everything has gone wrong, says the Mongol Rally's website. (Mongol Rally)

  • You can rally in any car you want, as long as it has an engine of 1-liter or less. (Mongol Rally)

  • "The Mongol Rally is about getting lost, using your long neglected wits, raising shedloads of cash for charity and scraping into the finish line with your vehicle in tatters and a wild grin smeared across your grubby face." - Mongol Rally website (Mongol

There are only three rules for the 10,000-mile Mongol Rally car rally from London to Mongolia: you can take any car you want, as long as it has an engine of one liter or less; you can’t have a support team or road back-up; and you have to help save the world (or, to be more specific, you have to raise at least £1,000 – about $1,500 – for the rally’s environmental charity, Cool Earth).

Other than that, you’re on your own. Literally. Once you’ve decorated your car, charted your route and packed your suitcases, you point your car towards Mongolia and leave. Along the way, you cross more than 17 countries, head through mountains and deserts, cross a sea or two and skirt several war zones.

The rally is not without it’s risks – it has resulted in some injuries and at least one death. But most participants do arrive safely, (if not a little dusty and weather beaten) from the journey.

One of this year’s participants is 20-year-old Amherst College student and Massachusetts resident David Lander, who is partnering with three of his friends – Zeke Vainer, Percy Stogdon and Sam Stogdon – to raise money for the international streetfootballworld charity, in addition to the race’s official charity. He discussed the rally with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

[Youtube]

Guest

  • David Lander, student at Amherst College.

 

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