National

  • 5:52pm Dec 15, 2017
    National National Economy Politics & Government

    Trump Could Have Tax Bill On His Desk Before Holiday Break

    At the moment, it appears that President Trump will get his Christmas wish: To have tax overhaul legislation on his desk, ready for his signature, before the holiday break. NPR's Robert Siegel talks to economist and Harvard professor Gregory Mankiw about the GOP Tax Plan.
  • 5:52pm Dec 15, 2017
    National National

    An Outsider's View Of How the U.S. Treats Its Most Vulnerable

    Philip Alston is the United Nations' special rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights. He speaks with NPR's Kelly McEvers about a report he is compiling on how the United State's most vulnerable are treated by the government.
  • 5:52pm Dec 15, 2017
    National National

    Where Does The #MeToo Movement Go From Here?

    NPR's Kelly McEvers talks with New York Magazine's Rebecca Traister and writer Ijeoma Oluo about the post-Weinstein era. The two women reflect on where this #MeToo movement goes from here, and the complexities surrounding how we should address the issue of sexual harassment in workplaces.
  • 5:52pm Dec 15, 2017
    National National Politics & Government

    Alabama Democrats Describe Doug Jones' Win As 'Euphoria'

    It's been a big week for the Democratic Party — but it's been an even bigger week for lifelong Alabama Democrats. NPR talked to a handful of them to ask the significance of Doug Jones winning a U.S. Senate seat — the first Democrat to do so in Alabama in more than two decades.
  • 4:23pm Dec 15, 2017
    National National

    How TV Foreshadowed The #MeToo Movement

    In All Things Considered's final installment of "Highly Specific Superlatives," NPR's TV critic Eric Deggans talks about the scene in a TV show that best foreshadowed the #MeToo movement.
  • 4:23pm Dec 15, 2017
    National National Politics & Government

    DHS Wants To Build A Computer System To Help Determine Who Gets To Visit The U.S.

    Can a computer tell if you're going to be a productive member of society? Can it tell if you're a terrorist? The Department of Homeland Security is trying to answer these questions. The agency hopes to build a computer system to help determine who gets to visit or immigrate to the U.S., but that idea has some techies worried.